Tostada Tuesday

Chicken Tostadas, a quick and easy meal

Chicken Tostadas, a quick and easy meal

Taco Tuesday? Not this Tuesday. I thought I would switch it up and make it Tostada Tuesday. I love tostadas. These bigger cousins of the chalupa are ever so versatile. Topped with just a bit of cream they can be a simple snack, but the flat, crispy tortilla can also be the perfect vessel for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

There are many beautiful qualities about the tostada. They are quick. They are easy. They can be topped with almost anything. They can be eaten with one hand. 

Homemade tostada shells aren't that difficult

Homemade tostada shells aren't that difficult

HOW TO PREPARE THE TOSTADA SHELL

You will need corn tortillas - as many as you like to make. I like to make about 6-12 at a time and store them in a airtight container with a paper towel to absorb moisture. I'll eat them different ways over the next couple days.

Use a medium saucepan and fill with about 1/2 inch of oil. Heat oil on medium-high until it is hot. Throw in a tiny piece of tortilla to test the heat of the oil. If it bubbles and crackles fast its hot and ready. If you're oil isn't hot enough, your tortillas will get heavy and greasy. You don't want that.

Using tongs, gently slide your tortilla into the hot oil. It will crackle and begin to puff up. Sometimes, I lightly press the center down to make sure it has contact with the oil. After cooking on one side for about 40-60 seconds the bottom side should start to be golden brown. Flip the tortilla over and continue to cook until other side is golden brown and the tortilla is lightly crisp. Remove tortilla with tongs, let excess oil drip into pan and set on plate lined with a paper towel so that it can drain any extra oil. Tortilla will get a little more crispy as it sits.

Wait a few moments for oil to return to temperature and repeat process with remaining tortillas. If you are eating them all right away or having a tostada party, after draining excess oil, you can place them on a cookie sheet on low in the oven to keep them warm and crispy.

TOPPING...THE FUN PART!

As a I said, these crunchy tortillas are perfect for a snack or a full meal. I often put some delicious Mexican cream on top and eat them just like that. I got hooked on that after eating the best cream and tostadas with my pozole at La Casa de Toño in Mexico City. Here are some of my other favorite ways to make tostadas.

BEAN AND CHEESE TOSTADA

Bean and cheese tostadas are a simple favorite everyone loves, especially kids. Start with my Chorizo Black Bean recipe (or any other prepared beans). Place prepared beans in a bowl and mash with back of fork to create a paste. You may also add a little water to "loosen" the bean paste. Spread mashed beans over tostada shell, top with cheese and set under broiler until cheese is melted. Kick it up with salsa, cream and avocado or guacamole.

Bean and cheese tostada

Bean and cheese tostada

Kick it up with cream, salsa, and avocado (or guacamole)

Kick it up with cream, salsa, and avocado (or guacamole)

BREAKFAST TOSTADA

Start with your bean and cheese layer. I added sautéed brussel sprouts and topped with a fried egg. Serve with salsa and cream.

Breakfast tostada topped with fried egg

Breakfast tostada topped with fried egg

LUNCH TOSTADA

Once again, start with bean and cheese. Top with shredded lettuce or cabbage for a light, refreshing lunch. Add a little salt, cream, cilantro. If you want to kick it up add some onions, chiles or salsa.

Tostadas for lunch or an afternoon snack

Tostadas for lunch or an afternoon snack

Tostadas - flat, crunchy and no utensils needed.

Tostadas - flat, crunchy and no utensils needed.

DINNER TOSTADAS

A quick easy dinner for me is chicken tostadas. With your shells and beans already made, you can stop buy the market and grab a rotisserie chicken if you don't feel like cooking. Top your tostada shell with beans, cheese, and chicken and heat in the oven. Top with cream, salsa and guacamole.

Chicken tostadas for dinner.

Chicken tostadas for dinner.

Provecho!

Recipe: Strawberry-Mint Agua Fresca

Strawberry-mint agua fresca

Strawberry-mint agua fresca

If you want the perfect afternoon refreshment, make a Strawberry-Mint Agua Fresca. "Agua fresca" translates as "fresh water" and is a blend of natural fruit juice and water. It's quick, easy and will make you feel a lot better in the heat.

STRAWBERRY-MINT AGUA FRESCA RECIPE

INGREDIENTS:
• 1 Basket Strawberries
• 1 Handful Mint Leaves
• 2-4 TBSP Brown Sugar (optional)
• Pinch of Salt
• 6-8 Cups Water

Strawberry-mint agua fresca

Strawberry-mint agua fresca

METHOD:

1. Wash and stem strawberries. Wash a small bunch of mint and pick leaves off until you have a handful of mint leaves.

2. Add Strawberries and 2 Cups water to blender. Blend for about 2 minutes until smooth.

3. Add mint leaves, salt and brown sugar. Blend for about another 30 seconds. NOTE: Brown sugar is optional. Only if your berries are a bit tart or if you like things on the sweeter side. You of course can also substitute sweeteners like regular sugar, honey or agave nectar.

4. Pour mixture into a large pitcher. Stir in 4-6 cups of water.  NOTE: You can add more water if you like it on the lighter side. You can also strain the mixture before you pour it into the pitcher. I prefer to have all the bits and pieces.

5. Serve cold over ice with mint garnish. It's also good with a squeeze of lime. It's even better with some tequila or mezcal!

PROVECHO!

Recipe: Chorizo Black Beans

I love Chorizo Black Beans. This is a recipe I developed as a base for my tostadas. The mix of pork and beans is obvious, but the chorizo gives it an extra kick and depth of flavor. Another layer of aromatics is added with my secret ingredient... cinnamon. Just enough to make you say "mmm... what is that?".

Chorizo black beans

Chorizo black beans

This recipe is super simple. It makes a great side dish, filling for burritos or mashed as topping for tostadas. You can also mash and fry them for refried beans. Make these Chorizo Black Beans with an overnight soak, quick prep and let it go on the stove top for awhile...

CHORIZO BLACK BEAN RECIPE

INGREDIENTS:
1 Bag 16oz. Black Beans
1lb Mexican Chorizo Sausage* (Removed from skin and roughly chopped)
1 Small Purple Onion Diced (White Onion works as well)
3-4 Whole Cloves of Garlic Crushed
1 tsp. Salt
1 tsp. Black Pepper
1 tsp. Cinnamon
1/2 tsp. Garlic Salt
1/2 tsp. Dried Rosemary Leaves
Water

TOOLS:
Large Stock Pot

* Mexican Chorizo Sausage is available in most large cities at Mexican markets and butchers (Carniceria). It's best to get it fresh, but you can also get it pre-packaged in the refrigerated section near the bacon or Mexican cheeses in your grocery store. You may also use any type of sausage or even ham or bacon if you wanted.

Chorizo black beans

Chorizo black beans

METHOD:

1. Rinse beans. Pick out any stones, broken beans and dried, weird looking beans.

2. Put beans in large stock pot and fill with water until beans are covered with about 2 1/2 inches of water above beans. Cover pot with a cloth and leave on countertop overnight for beans to soak. Soak for 18-24 hours.

3. Dice onion. Peel garlic and crush with side of knife.  

4. Put stock pot on stove top with beans and water. Add onion and garlic. Cover pot and bring to a boil. 

5. Once beans are boiling, lower heat to a low simmer. Add salt, pepper, garlic salt, rosemary and cinnamon. 

6. Simmer for 1 hour, stirring occasionally.

7. While beans are simmering, prepare chorizo. Using a sharp knife, slice the skin of the chorizo all the way down. The skin should peel right back and you can scrape the meat out of the skin onto a chopping board. Give the chorizo a rough chop.

8. After one hour, add chorizo and stir together. Continue to cook for 30-45 minutes. 

9. After a total cooking time of 1hr30min - 1hr45min, check beans for doneness. They should be soft at this point. If not, continue cooking a little longer until the beans are soft. At this point also add salt if needed. I don't start with a lot of salt because the saltiness of the chorizo varies greatly. So you may or may not need more salt.

Serve as a side topped with melted cheese, over nachos, in a burrito or mashed on a tostada.

Provecho!

Breakfast at La Cadencia Lonchería, Mexico City

Alambres de pollo, covered in melted cheese

Alambres de pollo, covered in melted cheese

If you're looking for a good bite to eat in the Roma neighborhood of Mexico City, check out La Cadencia Lonchería. It's more than just a stop for cyclists and local hipsters, it's a little loncheria offering breakfast, lunch and dinner. The funky decor made of bike parts supports their menu of traditional Mexican dishes with a twist. The food is freshly prepared in huge portions. The staff is friendly and efficient. My friends and I have eaten here several times and always had excellent service. My friend Tara swears by the molletes, a cheesy breakfast bread, and I'm a fan of the chilaquiles with mole sauce and alambres.

This little spot is always a reliable spot to meet up with friends or bring guests visiting from out-of-town. If you're a vegan or vegetarian, they have plenty of options for you, including tofu! They are also pet friendly and bike friendly too. They have a great lunch deal for comida corrida, so check out La Candencia Lonchería for a good bite.

Chilaquiles with chicken and mole sauce

Chilaquiles with chicken and mole sauce

Molletes, a typical Mexican breakfast

Molletes, a typical Mexican breakfast

Coffee and juice served with breakfast

Coffee and juice served with breakfast

"Agua del dia" - fresh water of melon on this day

"Agua del dia" - fresh water of melon on this day

La Cadencia Lonchería
Tonalá 183B, esquina Calle Chiapas
Colonia Roma, Delegación Cuauhtemoc
Ciudad de México, DF 06700

 

Cooking with Flor de Bótil

Flor de Bótil

Flor de Bótil

I was walking through Mercado Viejo in San Cristóbal the other morning when I came across a girl with a large pile of small, scarlet flowers. I had never seen these before and of course I was curious as to what they were. I stopped under her umbrella and asked what these little blooms were. She replied "flor de bótil". She proceeded to tell me they were delicious and how to prepare them by boiling them and then mixing them with eggs. I was intrigued and they were to beautiful to pass up, so I took 10 pesos worth. Marta was at the house when I returned and she explained to me that they were the flower of the beans on the milpa. Marta, knowing I love to cook, also suggested that I sauté them with onion and tomato. I knew I had some experimenting to do in the kitchen. 

Buying Flor de Bótil at Mercado Viejo in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico.

Buying Flor de Bótil at Mercado Viejo in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico.

The next morning I woke and took the pups out for one of our morning hikes. This time I took a different route and ended up wandering through a gorgeous milpa abundant with corn, squash and flor de bótil. There they were! Twisting their way up stalks of corn with their tiny little reg flags signaling the bees. I got excited to get home to the flowers I had waiting to be cooked.

Flor de Bótil growing in Chiapas, Mexico

Flor de Bótil growing in Chiapas, Mexico

Flower of Flor de Bótil

Flower of Flor de Bótil

Bean shoots growing up the corn stalk

Bean shoots growing up the corn stalk

Beans, squash and corn all growing together on a milpa in Chiapas, Mexico

Beans, squash and corn all growing together on a milpa in Chiapas, Mexico

When I got home, I decided to make a basic base with the flowers that I could use in a variety of dishes. So here's what I did...

• Rinse the flowers in water, cleaning of dirt and debris. Separate any wilted and discolored flowers. You don't need to cut the shoots, as they will shrivel and shrink as you cook them.
• Place clean flowers in a large sauté pan and add water until flowers are completely submerged and about 1/4" of water over them. Salt water very well.
• Bring to a boil and reduce heat.
• Simmer for 7-10 minutes until shoots and flowers are tender and flowers begin to darken.
• Remove from heat and strain off water.

The flowers are edible at this point and make a healthy side dish with a little salt and pepper.

Tamale served with Flor de Bótil sautéed with garlic and onion over refried beans

Tamale served with Flor de Bótil sautéed with garlic and onion over refried beans

But to kick them up a little...

Return to pan with a finely diced garlic, onion and sauté with a little olive oil or butter. Now this makes a super tasty side dish that you can serve with rice and beans, tamales or even put on a tortilla and make a veggie taco.

Also with this mixture, you can add to fried potatoes, scrambled eggs or make an omelet with some quesillo. You can make empanadas or a fried cake similar to torta de huauzontle.

Don't be afraid to try this legume if you see it in the market. And once you notice this beautiful flower, you'll see it everywhere; on farms, on the roadside and even in local textiles. Seeing it's representation in local art, makes you realize how important this plant is to the region.

Read more about Flor de Bótil on Milpapedia.

Flor de Bótil depicted in local textile embroidery

Flor de Bótil depicted in local textile embroidery

Weaving in San Juan Cancuc, Chiapas

Nestled in a highland valley about an hour outside San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico, lies the small community of San Juan Cancuc. The inhabitants are indigenous Maya and speak their indigenous language, mostly Tseltal. In the tradition of weaving and embroidery unique to each community, the people of San Juan Cancuc have their distinctive fashion emblazoned with bold, geometric patterns.

Juana of San Juan Cancuc, Chiapas proudly shows us one of her complex designs

Juana of San Juan Cancuc, Chiapas proudly shows us one of her complex designs

Many people in the community proudly wear their ancestral clothing. Styles that have been passed down for generations can be seen being worn while passing through the small town center. However, these labor-intensive fashions take a lot of time to produce and are a high cost for locals. Because of this, locals opt to purchase more affordable clothes like jeans and t-shirts. You see this change especially in the dress of the men.

Larimie (back) in traditional men's garment of San Juan Cancuc handmade by Juana (front)

Larimie (back) in traditional men's garment of San Juan Cancuc handmade by Juana (front)

The men of San Juan Cancuc wear long white tunics accented by incredible embroidery in fantastical colors. The bold designs cover the cuffs of the long sleeves and the chest area up to around the neck. A thin vertical line extends from the bottom edge of the design to the bottom edge of the garment. The best thing about this garment is that there are large holes under the sleeves that cut down the side slightly. These serve two purposes; when it’s cold you can fold your arms in the sleeves up inside across your chest and when it’s hot, you can remove your arms from the long sleeves and let them hang decoratively.

Juana demonstrates the backstop loom as her kids play nearby

Juana demonstrates the backstop loom as her kids play nearby

Little Juana with a huipil folded on her head.

Little Juana with a huipil folded on her head.

The women on the other hand wear short sleeve huipils, that have the chest and back blocked with a field of embroidered designs. At the bottom of the embroidery block, there is one broad vertical line of design on each side of the block that continues down the length of the dress.

Little Juana shows us one of the recently completed designs by her mother.

Little Juana shows us one of the recently completed designs by her mother.

Spending an afternoon seeing how these garments are made is always an unforgettable trip. We headed to San Juan Cancuc with a lovely woman I know from San Cristóbal, Marta. We headed to Marta's sister-in-law's home. Welcomed by Juana, who is a skilled weaver, and her lovely family, we get to pass the afternoon at their humble home located up a small path through the brush and trees. Here she demonstrates the unique style of weaving to San Juan Cancuc that incorporates embroidered geometric patterns. Everything is made by hand on the Mayan backstrap loom. This ancient technique has been passed down for generations. In the simplest explanation, it involves a series of sticks that the thread is attached to. One end of the threads are secured on the stick and then to a pole. The other end is attached to a piece of leather that wraps around the artisan’s waist at her lower back. The loom extends and hangs about six feet between the pole to her waist. Once the strap is attached, the base layer of the textile is started. White thread is carefully woven between each thread from one side to the other. Once the thread is through, it is then pulled taut with a long piece of a wooden wedge that is placed through the threads and pulled toward the maker. This process is repeated and you can see the textile begin to form.

Juana happily details her garment with embroidery

Juana happily details her garment with embroidery

As the main cloth is made, there comes a time to add the embellishments. This is where the embroidery technique begins. Juana carefully lays in rows of brightly colored thread. As she weaves each small section, she counts the threads as this is how she knows her design. She actually can’t see her design as she is making it because it is on the reverse side as she weaves. The rows of color begin to take shape as a grid of brightly colored blocks. Her eleven year old daughter, Juana, carefully watches her mother as she too is learning this art form.

Eleven year old Juana shows us what she can do with the backstrap loom

Eleven year old Juana shows us what she can do with the backstrap loom

The pattern design on the garments of San Juan Cancuc are easily recognizable. Intense hues with brilliant pinks and darker tones like deep purples and blacks are arranged in columns of color. The younger generation can be seen experimenting with patterns including zig zag and floral motifs. One of these woven pieces takes about three months to complete working on them partially throughout the day.

Family portrait in San Juan Cancuc, Chiapas, Mexico

Family portrait in San Juan Cancuc, Chiapas, Mexico

The weaving demonstration is punctuated by everyday life. The kids, shy at first, quickly warm up to me and Manuel de Jesus can’t get enough of the camera. They play around the yard and want to show us parts of their wonderful life. Around the house, we discovered chicken coops, a rabbit pen, a small nursery where they are growing coffee plants, a beautiful little vegetable garden abundant with cabbage and plenty of wild edibles growing in the surrounding nature. Little Juana climbed one of the mango trees to pick us some delicious mangoes.

Little Juana climbs the mango tree to pick us some fruit.

Little Juana climbs the mango tree to pick us some fruit.

Mid-air mango! Manuel de Jesus cowers as his sister tosses a mango to him.

Mid-air mango! Manuel de Jesus cowers as his sister tosses a mango to him.

Mango time!

Mango time!

After spending time on the porch weaving with Juana, she prepared a local staple, pozol. This isn’t the soup some of you might be thinking of. This is a traditional drink made with water and fermented masa (corn dough) - sometimes cacao is added for a different flavor. This drink is what the men drink before and after going out to work for the day instead of eating a regular meal. It is said to provide potent energy for the day’s work.

Juana mixes a regional drink of fermented masa (corn dough) and water known as "Pozol"

Juana mixes a regional drink of fermented masa (corn dough) and water known as "Pozol"

Marta picks wild epazote on the hillside

Marta picks wild epazote on the hillside

Cabbage patch in the garden

Cabbage patch in the garden

Juana cuts us some cabbage from her garden to take home

Juana cuts us some cabbage from her garden to take home

Manuel de Jesus has coffee growing at several stages in his nursery

Manuel de Jesus has coffee growing at several stages in his nursery

Kids having fun with the pet rabbits

Kids having fun with the pet rabbits

Fresh honey collected from their bees being bottled to go.

Fresh honey collected from their bees being bottled to go.

When Juana’s husband, Manuel de Jesus (not the junior mentioned earlier), returned from worked he greeted us and then the first thing he did was sit down for a large bowl of pozol. We then went to a small shed where he shared some of their honey that they’ve collected from their bees. It was delicious and I took a small bottle home.

As it was time to end the day, Marta, her daughter and I headed back to San Cristóbal with some extra goodies besides woven goods. We left with honey, a branch of bananas, epazote, cabbage, a rabbit and an great appreciation for this amazing culture.

Little Juana carries a branch of bananas with a head-strap down the trail to the car.

Little Juana carries a branch of bananas with a head-strap down the trail to the car.

Recipe: Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Chicharron Prensado

Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Chicharron Prensado

Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Chicharron Prensado

While in Mexico City, I'm enjoying some of my old favorites (which always includes tacos) and always discovering new flavors. While at Mercado Medellín I as waking by the butcher and discovered a pork product that's new to me. It's called chicharron prensado. It's different pieces of pork meat and fat that is mixed with guajllo chiles and some other spices. The meat is then pressed into a giant cylinder. It basically looks like a giant piece of salami that is a foot and a half in diameter. Then when it's cut, it shaves off into pretty little chunks of a deep red color.

Mercado Medellín in Mexico City where I do most of my shopping

Mercado Medellín in Mexico City where I do most of my shopping

Chicharron Prensado, The meat is pressed into a block and then shaved off.

Chicharron Prensado, The meat is pressed into a block and then shaved off.

Chicharron Prensado has a deep red color from Guajillo Chile.

Chicharron Prensado has a deep red color from Guajillo Chile.

Brussel sprouts roasting in the oven with baked mac'n'cheese

Brussel sprouts roasting in the oven with baked mac'n'cheese

Since I was having dinner with the "gringas", we decided to make the American classic of baked mac'n'cheese. But we needed a vegetable side. Even though we would have been fine with an overload of four cheeses.

I decided to make an adaptation of a roasted brussel sprouts recipe that I make often. Instead of bacon though, I used the delicious chicharron prensado.

Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Chicharron Prensado Recipe

INGREDIENTS:

12 brussel sprouts (medium size, cut in half from pole to pole)
1/2 cup Chicharron Prensado (or more if you like pork as much as I do)
4-5 cloves of garlic chopped fine
1 lemon
1/4 cup olive oil
Salt & pepper to taste

METHOD:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Use a small baking dish and pour half the oil in the dish so that the bottom if well coated and there is a nice layer of olive oil. Toss the brussel sprouts with the rest of the oil so that they are well coated (I do this all in the same dish). Make sure the flat side of the brussel sprouts are face down in the pan. Squeeze over the juice of one lemon. Add salt and pepper to taste. Add garlic and chicharron prensado over the top. I add this last so that the sprouts can be well salted themselves.

Place in preheated oven on middle rack and bake 25-30 minutes until sprouts are fork tender through the middle. When ready, give a quick blast under the broiler for 2-3 minutes. When they start to brown they are done. Watch closely during this step so that the small bits of garlic don't burn.

Serve as a side. In this case, with Mac'n'cheese.

Provecho!

Note: you can substitute bacon instead of the chicharron. If you do you won't need as much salt because it's salty already. The chicharron isn't too salty, just full of flavor!

Churros in Coyoacán

Churro Relleno (filled with Chocolate)

Churro Relleno (filled with Chocolate)

You'll see churros all over in Mexico City. It's like Mexico's doughnut. But some of my favorites are the Churros Rellenos (Filled Churros) in Coyoacán. Definitely my favorite street food desert (aside from ice cream). If you're going to visit the Frida Kahlo Museum, it's a short walk to Jardin Plaza Hidalgo which joins with Jardin Centenario to make up the main square in the neighborhood of Coyoacán.

Churro Vendor in Coyoacán

Churro Vendor in Coyoacán

Freshly fried churros on the streets of Coyoacán, Mexico City

Freshly fried churros on the streets of Coyoacán, Mexico City

Hand written menu of filling options for your churro relleno

Hand written menu of filling options for your churro relleno

You'll find plenty of restaurants, shops and street vendors. But what you want to find is the Churros. Delicious tubes of deep fried dough is filled with your choice of fillings. They have everything from chocolate or cheese to strawberry of mango. I love the chocolate or cajeta, which is like a rich burnt goats milk. It's sweet and gooey like caramel.

Frying churros on the street.

Frying churros on the street.

Guamúchil

Guamúchil, a Mexican Fruit

You can eat the fleshy, white bean of the Guamúchil

Today while walking through the streets of Coyoacan, we came across a very strange looking fruit neither of us had seen before. Mexico once again surprised us with the Guamúchil.

Guamúchil is a strange looking fruit native to the Mexico region of Guerrero. Their unique pods twist and curl as they grow on the tree. This legume's green husks blush with an intense red which hide a fleshy white or pink fruit inside. This fruit can be enjoyed raw by removing from the beans from the reddish-green shell. Remove the black seeds from the center of the bean and enjoy the white fruit. The fruit is spongy like a soft nut and has a mild sweet flavor that is reminiscent of a white nectarine.

This fruit can be found in markets and especially in small towns and villages where you will find people selling them on the streets through the months of January and August. In smaller towns you will also find people not only using this as a source of food, but as a medicinal plants that can help toothaches and oral ulcers.

This unique fruit is worth giving a taste!

USES:
• Eat the fruit raw by removing the light fleshy beans from the husk. Remove the white flesh from the black seed at the center. Eat the white flesh of the bean.
• Can be dried to preserve longer to eat later.
• A marmelade can be made of the fruit
• Used as a medicinal plant for toothaches and oral ulcers

FIND IT:
Find it the market and small towns on the streets seasonally between January and August. It can be found through the regions of Guerrero, Baja California, Oaxaca, San Luis Potosi, Quintanaroo, and Yucatan.

MiMilpa, planting the first seed

Welcome to Mexico, where delight and delicious meet.

MiMilpa wants you to savor every moment of the Mexican lifestyle. Our curated experiences bring you closer to understanding the relationship between regional flavors, fine artistry, natural wonders and impressive creations that make up the ever-changing facets of Mexico. Through creating connections, we are able to nurture relationships between locals and travelers that facilitate learning, sharing and preserving culinary traditions and regional ideologies while directly supporting community advancement. As two friends who are passionate about Mexican food and culture, we want you to experience the full richness of Mexico through gastronomic get-aways with an enjoyable group people you will love.

We came together over a cup of Mexican coffee. A chance meeting that would turn into a friendship and business partnership. After chatting about similar visions, we decided to create MiMilpa - a place to share our enthusiasm and knowledge of Mexican gastronomy with the world. Mexican gastronomy has been recognized by Unesco as an intangible Cultural Heritage for it’s rich history, diverse ingredients and ancient techniques that have been passed down through generations.

If you are a foodie or a traveler seeking the next level in culinary adventures, look no further. MiMilpa will be bringing you gastronomic experiences such as hands-on cooking classes, food tours, field trips, guides and publications. Be one of the first to take a bite of Mexico with us. Book a tour now.